There are various ways to shoot extreme close-ups, including the use of hollow extension tubes, reversing rings or close-up ‘filters’ that screw into to the accessory attachment thread of regular lenses. However, the main advantage of any ‘system’ camera like a DSLR or mirrorless camera is that you can fit the right lens for the shooting scenario. And when it comes to getting in close, there’s no beating a proper macro lens. body .hawk-widget{–trd-blue:#2f6e91;width:100%;letter-spacing:normal;}._hawk.subtitle~.hawk-widget[data-widget-type=price]{margin:16px 0;}@media (min-width:600px){._hawk.subtitle~.hawk-widget[data-widget-type=price]{margin:0;min-height:128px;float:right;clear:none;width:50%;}.fancy_box_body ._hawk.subtitle~.hawk-widget[data-widget-type=price]{float:none;width:100%;}}.icon~.hawk-widget{clear:both;} You’ll often see telephoto zoom lenses with the word ‘macro’ somewhere in their title, but they typically give a maximum magnification factor of merely 0.3x to 0.5x. By comparison, most (but not all) macro prime lenses deliver a full 1.0x or 1:1 magnification ratio. But what does that actually mean? Basically, at 1.0x magnification, an object will be reproduc...