Affinity Investment Advisors Raised Its Apple (AAPL) Holding by $1.10 Million; As Medtronic (MDT) Valuation Declined, Exchange Capital Management Has Lifted Stake

Affinity Investment Advisors Llc increased its stake in Apple Inc (AAPL) by 7.12% based on its latest 2019Q1 regulatory filing with the SEC. Affinity Investment Advisors Llc bought 5,820 shares as the company’s stock rose 12.19% with the market. The institutional investor held 87,568 shares of the computer manufacturing company at the end of 2019Q1, valued at $16.63 million, up from 81,748 at the end of the previous reported quarter. Affinity Investment Advisors Llc who had been investing in Apple Inc for a number of months, seems to be bullish on the $913.68 billion market cap company. The stock decreased 0.10% or $0.2 during the last trading session, reaching $198.58. About 14.46 million shares traded. Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) has risen 1.47% since June 24, 2018 and is uptrending. It has underperformed by 2.96% the S&P500. Some Historical AAPL News: 31/03/2018 – Tom Warren: @linear2202 they’re hilarious. Especially people asking if Apple pays me and claiming Android is open; 27/03/2018 – Apple’s education event: Live notes There’s a new iPad. And more; 20/04/2018 – Dow drops 200 as Apple drags tech lower; 02/04/2018 – Bloomberg TV: BREAKING: Apple is planning to use its ow...

There was so much kerfuffle around Uber’s public market debut that it was hard to sort

There was so much kerfuffle around Uber’s public market debut that it was hard to sort through the noise. Vitalyi Katsenelson, the CEO of Investment Management Associates, wrote a column for Fortune explaining why the Uber IPO was not a failure, but rather, how the IPO market is not designed to actually benefit the shareholders of the IPO company. Where the stock trades at the opening has little to do with what the company is worth, and has everything to do with supply (insiders selling shares) and demand (mutual fund and hedge fund interest in the stock). That’s it. The underwriters’ job is to assess interest on both sides and set a price near equilibrium. The conflicts inherent in this situation show Wall Street at its worst. The underwriters are supposed to represent the interests of their client, the IPO company (in fact, they get paid handsomely to do so). But there is a conflict between the one-time fee they receive from that company (plus, maybe, the fees they receive if the post-IPO company decides to seek their advice in future M&A activity) and the very predictable trading commissions that are trickling in every single day from their large brokerage clients. Ultima...