You’ll get best benefits of Kombucha if you brew your own

I read your nutrition column every chance I get. I would like your input on Kombucha (organic and raw gingerade). My grandsons have been drinking this for months; they have interested me in trying it. I am a young 78-year-old woman. Just wondering if it is good to drink this daily? I have bought a small bottle to try it; the taste is OK. I guess what I’m asking is: Is it healthy for me to continue with Kombucha? I would appreciate your input. Thank you for reading regularly and for sending in another great question! I’m also glad you’re looking for ways to improve your health! There are many things you can do in your retirement years to boost your energy and vitality and protect against senility and bone fractures. Primarily, I recommend a whole foods, unprocessed diet with a lot of fatty fish, and staying active. And yes, I do promote the use of Kombucha, although my preference is homemade. Making it is not difficult and is very inexpensive. It can also be quite fun to try to make different flavours. But I do know not everyone is going to take the time to do this with any regularity, as many are busy or out of the habit of homemade foods. Home brew Kombucha is popular now becau...

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What can we help you find? Enter search terms and tap the Search button. Both articles and products will be searched. Please note: If you have a promotional code you’ll be prompted to enter it prior to confirming your order. If you subscribe to any of our print newsletters and have never activated your online account, please activate your account below for online access. By activating your account, you will create a login and password. You only need to activate your account once. A number of foods — yogurt, sauerkraut, as well as some less-familiar ones such as kimchi and tempeh — are made by fermentation, an age-old tradition for preserving food. These foods, as well as the fermented drinks kombucha and kefir, have been getting buzz in recent years, mostly focused on their potential to enhance gut health. Fermented products contain naturally occurring beneficial bacteria known as probiotics, which are thought to improve digestion. Probiotics found in fermented foods may also provide modest heart-related benefits, according to a review article published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology last year. One study found that eating kimchi (see “What are ...